Cracking coffee cherries

batangas1

How far are you willing to work to be able to try some new coffee you haven’t tried before? For most people, roasting green coffee beans is unheard of. And I thought pounding on them coffee bean still in parchment was already hard work. Maybe sorting the defective beans from the good beans was too tiring a job, too.

Yesterday, a friend sent his driver to bring me some coffee, still in cherry form! The cherries are dry, but they smell good. That for a while I thought it wasn’t coffee but something else. My son RK said they smell like sampaloc (aka tamarind). But when he opened one cherry, we were sure those were coffee beans inside.

I was told this came from Batangas, a coffee growing area up North in Luzon. It’s known for its Barako (some Liberica variety) coffee. Maybe these are Barako, too. They’re slightly bigger than most of the beans in my stash, except the Sumatra Iskandar.

So I really want to try these beans. Not easy to extract them. I had to pound each and every hardened dried cherry to get the two beans inside. Not easy work. I was working half an hour, and I only got 53 grams worth of green beans! Will keep pounding every now and then, in between other work. Until I can get enough beans to roast, maybe 200 grams worth. Whoa! That sounds like 2 hours of hard labor!

Experiencing hard work like this, makes you appreciate more the long work involved in that cup of joe you drink every morning.

Dried coffee cherries

Dried coffee cherries

Poor me pounding on them coffee cherries, one by one.

Poor me pounding on them coffee cherries, one by one.

They look like Barako, ain't they?

They look like Barako, ain't they?

What I got after maybe 30 minutes of work! :-(

What I got after maybe 30 minutes of work! :-(

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